Q. 60: What Group of People Was Taken to America and Sold As Slaves?

Painting of sailing ships

On August 9, 1526, the first boat carrying African slaves arrived in the New World at Winyah Bay. The institution of slavery predated the founding of the United States of America in 1776, and the treatment of Africans as chattel continued for more than a century afterward.

Q. 55: What Are Two Ways That Americans Can Participate in Their Democracy?

Photo ballot box

Ordinary people can play a small or even a large part in changing political outcomes in the United States. While a solitary vote isn’t likely to change an election, voting still matters, and a single letter to a member of Congress might be enough initiate a change in law. Simple acts likes writing a letter to a newspaper, might leave you pleasantly surprised when they proceed to publish it. 

Q. 39: How Many Justices Are on the Supreme Court?

Judge signing papers

The existence of the Supreme Court of the United States, as it is known today, was the direct result of the Judiciary Act of 1789. Presently, the Supreme Court, also known as SCOTUS, acts as the court of last resort and is considered the head of the federal judicial system. As the court of last resort, its justices review decisions rendered by the lower federal courts.

Q. 33: Who Signs Bills To Become Laws?

Photo of man signing document

After a bill passes through both chambers of the United States Congress, it will then be presented to the head of the executive branch, the President of the United States, for his approval.

Q. 34: Who Vetoes Bills?

United States Congress

The power to veto bills lies exclusively with the President of the United States. According to Section 7 of Article I of the United States Constitution, the president is given 10 days in which to either sign a bill into law or veto it.