Founding Father John Adams

Biography Of John Adams

John Adams was the second president of the United States of America, and he was known for his brilliance and impetuous anger, which he inherited from his mother. He was a lawyer and a diplomat, and his colleagues respected him for his brilliant speech, which convinced the first Continental Congress to declare independence.

Early Life

John Adams was born on October 30th, 1735, in Braintree, Norfolk, Massachusetts. As a child, Adams didn’t find school to be an exciting place, and he would skip classes to fish or hunt. This caused his father to worry about his son’s future, and he had to force Adams to receive a formal education, which eventually paid off. He was an excellent student in school, and he gained admission to Harvard University, after which he enrolled in a law school between 1756 to 1758.

In 1758, Adams started his legal career but getting his career set off was a struggle because he hardly won his cases. Luckily, he won his first case after three years of opening his legal practice, and following that, his success as a lawyer increased.

His Legal Career

John Adams is known for being one of the vocal opponents of the 1765 Stamp Act, which placed a hefty tax on all printed papers and documents in the American colony that didn’t have the imported British stamp. This act was imposed without any consultation with the American legislature. In December of 1765, John Adams delivered a brilliant speech that opposed the Stamp Act.

One highlight of his legal career was when he defended the British soldiers in the case of the Boston Massacre in 1770. Through his intellect and able defense, he prevented any of the accused from being jailed.

During the revolution, while the other founding fathers were on the war front, John Adams was sent on a diplomatic mission to negotiate the peace treaty between the United States and Great Britain. He is recognized as the diplomat who convinced France to be an ally to the US in the war against Britain.

On July 1st, 1776, two days before the declaration of Independence, John Adams gained the respect of all his colleagues. At a moment when Congress almost gave up on their idea of attaining independence due to a lack of an army, naval forces, and money, John Adams restored the hope of everyone in the room. Even though what he said wasn’t shared with the public, it was said that he gave a speech that made a case for independence. His speech revived the interest of everyone in the Continental Congress meeting room, and everyone who opposed the idea of independence averted from bending to the crown of Great Britain.

Political Career

During the election of 1788, John Adams was an opponent of George Washington for the presidential election. All the members of the Electoral College were allowed to cast two votes. The election results had George Washington winning with 45 out of 69 and John Adams with 34 votes.

George Washington appointed John Adams as his vice president. Adams accepted the role, however, he considered the vice presidency “the most insignificant office.” 

Fast forward to 1797, John Adams was elected president. As the second president of the United States, he maintained the same cabinet as George Washington and also continued most of Washington’s policies. While in office, he was known for opposing the advice of the cabinet, although, the cabinet respected him because most of his decisions turned out to be correct.

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